Episode #59: Occult Tales of the Funeral Guardians

Episode #59: Occult Tales of the Funeral Guardians

SonOfOdin goes "all in" for Black Metal History Month with four albums comprising the various subsections of the black metal genre. In the epic blackened folk section, it’s the Scottish band Saor. In the blackened death section, it’s Australian solo project The Furor. The indie act, Theosophy, provides a Russian interpretation. Finally, Heavy Metal Valhalla looks at black metal’s Norwegian roots with a clasic Darkthrone album. How will guest host Rock-Lobster Johnson respond?

More Rock-Lob:

Pre-Show Bullshittery

New Releases:

Saor : Guardians (2016)
Saor is the brainchild of Andy Marshall, allowing him to explore lengthy, Celtic-infused blackened soundscapes that feature themes and instruments from Scottish history.
Get this album: BandcampAmazon.comiTunesSpotify

The Furor : Cavalries of the Occult (2017)
First and foremost a drummer, Austrailian Louis "Disaster" Rando started The Furor as a (primarily) solo blackened death/thrash project to explore avenues he isn’t able to perform with his other bands.
Get this album: BandcampAmazon.comiTunes

Local/Indie Band:

Theosophy : Eastland Tales – Part II (2016)
Theosophy is a Black Metal band from the cold heart of Siberia, Russia. The band was founded in 2004, but put on ice until 2007.
Get this album: Label Shop     Info: FacebookYouTube

Heavy Metal Valhalla:

Darkthrone : Under a Funeral Moon (1993)
Darkthrone is a Norwegian black metal band formed in 1986. Their albums A Blaze in the Northern Sky, Under a Funeral Moon, and Transilvanian Hunger (sometimes dubbed the "Unholy Trinity") are considered some of the most influential albums in the genre.
Get this album: Amazon.comiTunesCD UniverseSpotify

Feedback:

Email : feedback@sonsofmetalpodcast.com
Facebook : The Sons of Metal Podcast Group
Twitter: @Sons_of_Metal
Voice Mail : +1 (224) 634-6766

Subscribe:

RSSiTunesGoogle PlayStitcherTuneInEmail

This podcast may contain copyrighted © material. The fair use of a copyrighted work, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright. This constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C., § 107 of the U.S. Copyright Law.

You may also like...